Media

The Real Work Behind Each Press Release

Don’t rely on the “send” button in your email distribution system, as the means to getting your press release converted into a media story.

The press release should only be sent after you have done the real work of putting together fact sheets, developed talking points, having the client approve a few opinion-editorials and communicated the significance of the issue with a reporter or select number of them. This doesn’t mean you have to conduct a press tour before issuing the release, but you need to pick up the phone and communicate your issue.

Identify key reporters (those who cover this particular issue or individuals you have built a relationship with) and give them a run down.

If the issue requires some background and/or a technical explanation, make the client or expert available to answer questions. This exercise will help you evaluate the situation and identify a missing component in your narrative. Keep the conversations “off the record” or “on-background” and embargo any documents until the release is sent (see Establishing Ground Rules with a Reporter).

By laying the groundwork first, a reporter is able to understand the issue and this takes away the guessing, as they scan through the 200+ daily press releases living in their inbox (see When to Send Out A Press Release).

Previewing the issue can also bring you back to earth.

At times, we get so caught up with the issue and client, that we become blinded as to whether the story is news worthy or get lost in the weeds that we fail to see the issue from the audience’s point of view. The last thing we want to do is come off as a conspiracy theorist.

Reporters will listen to your pitch, but also expect them to ask tough questions and verbalize the holes in your story. At the end your client will be better for it.

It is only after you go through this exercise, that you should feel confident in pressing the “send” button.

When to Send Out a Press Release

In communications, timing is everything.

After working hard on the language and tone of your press release, next comes the big question: “When should the release go out?” When determining the best time to send the press release, ask yourself, is the client seeking to minimize or  maximize exposure?

Minimize Coverage

If you are trying to minimize coverage, send the release on a Friday after 4:00 pm, when most reporters have already written their weekend article and it’s been submitted to the desk for review and editing.

If timing permits, schedule the release on the Friday before a 3-day holiday or the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. On those days, most broadcast stations have skeleton crews and print reporters will have already filed their articles and like most people, they are focused on something else, except work.

Even though it’s likely that most reporters will have mentally checked out for the long weekend, you still need to be prepared to answer media questions.

If you are trying to minimize exposure, you need to realize that there is no escaping coverage. With our mobile devices attached to our finger-tips, the endless number of bloggers and Google Alert, your content will be viewed by someone and will live online.

In a 24-hour news cycle world “flying under the radar” is impossible. Especially if the issue involves a high profile company, celebrity/politician/high powered executive or a topical issue.

Elements of your statement are bound to end up on social media, some blog or picked up by the weekend crew at a news station.

I have known too many people who don’t prepare, but spend their time hoping and praying that a weekend news story or sensational event will knock their story off a reporter’s list. That is a difficult way to live.

No matter the situation, have your talking points written out and be ready to respond.

Giving Your Story A Chance  

Each morning, most journalists are in front of their computers reading and sorting out their emails. They are looking for breaking news, scanning through the press releases and reviewing their in-progress files, before heading into a morning staff meeting.

Reporters receive 30-80 press releases a day, and in an election year, that number grows to 100-200+. If you don’t stand out, you’ll get buried.

In a press release, the subject line and first two to three sentences are key – eliminate the fluff and get to the point.

Also, try sharing your release at odd times. Instead of 7:30 am, send the release at 7:33 or 8:12. Don’t let your message get clogged up in the avalanche of pre-programed emails.

As to what day of the week works best, while weekends and Friday are not ideal, next comes Monday morning.

On Monday mornings, most people spend time sorting through and cleaning up their inbox – just look at the amount of junk mail you get throughout the weekend.

Like most people, reporters are spending their Monday mornings deleting, figuring out what is relevant or what emails to file for another day.

I like Tuesdays, Wednesday and Thursdays. You will be given an opportunity to connect with a reporter before you send out the release (more on this in my next article) and you don’t have to deal with the Monday morning email clutter.