Xavier Becerra

Xavier Becerra Gets No Love

Setting aside the snub of hiring Eric Holder to do the job Attorney General Xavier Becerra is supposed appointed and confirmed to do, Senate Pro Tem Kevin de Leon was recently on Univision’s weekend political show Conexión. DeLeon talked about immigration, Donald Trump, defending California’s rights and the like. He mentioned Eric Holder several times, but failed to mention Xavier Becerra.

If California politics was a 90’s sitcom, Becerra would be Screech from “Saved by the Bell” – he is part of the cast, but no one seems to cares.

screechxavier

Transcript and video file below:

TV Anchor Jairo Diaz Pedraza: Thank you very much Sergio Flores. Well we have the senator, the president [pro tempore] of the Senate, Kevin de León to answer these questions about the contract with Eric Holder for legal help in case of the possible… a possible trial against the Trump administration. Welcome Mr. León.

Senate President Pro Tempore Kevin de León: Thank you Jairo!

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: Tell us… tell us why hire Eric Holder?

Kevin de León: Well, I think that the candidacy of the President-elect is a threat, a real threat to our community, of the real interests of a great state like the great state of California. As the leader of the Senate, my role was to accept everything to defend the rights of our policies on the environment, climate change, health care, and the defense of the human rights of immigrants. I decided with my colleague, the Speaker of the Assembly, Anthony Rendon to contract the legal services of the ex-prosecutor of the country, the whole country of the United States under President Barack Obama, Mr. Eric Holder. To give us strategic legal tactics forbetter said, about what you can and cannot do to an administrator who continues to threaten the values of a great state like the state of California.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: How much will the state of California be paying Mr. Holder?

Kevin de León: It’s $25,000 a month. We split half of this bill, $12,500, from the Senate and $12,500 from the Assembly. But I think that…

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: For four years or for how long?

Kevin de León: For three months.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: Three months.

Kevin de León: And then we are going to re-negotiate. I think that it’s a payment, or [rather] a small investment in comparison to what is at stake. We have billions of dollars hanging by a thread right now.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: With the decision of President Trump?

Kevin de León: [Yes,] with the decision of President Trump.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: For example, how much would you take away? How much are we talking about Senator?

Kevin de León: It can be billions; it can be twenty, forty, sixty billion dollars. It’s not known yet, for example…

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: In which sectors?

Kevin de León: In medical care, the ACA that is the health care coverage of President Obama. It’s $20 billion that we receive every year for the more than 6.5 million people that are already enrolled in this medical care program.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: Sure.

Kevin de León: Of Obamacare. If the plan is to destroy and diminish the funds, as soon as possible, according to the statements of the Republicans in Congress as well as President-elect Trump, we will be left with a $20 billion dollar deficit in the budget in the state of California. That is true.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: Senator, There are 800,000 undocumented people who obtained their driver’s licenses. The federal government could demand the government of California to hand over all that information of the undocumented [people] for them to be able to locate and deport them.

Kevin de León: Look, [let’s] make this very clear, because I was the one who negotiated the driver’s licenses for the more than 800,000 people that can drive their cars today without the fear, without the terror, of having their car confiscated by a tow truck. Or much worse, being deported for being undocumented. The files, the personal data, are at this moment frozen in the records of the state of California. So that means, in a nutshell, if the federal government comes and says that they want access to that data, we will not give it to them. Now or later, today or tomorrow, or the next day, we will not hand over that data because that is personal data that belongs to the state of California, not the federal government.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: In 30 seconds Senator, a message for the undocumented [people] that are going to live these next four years with Donald Trump.

Kevin de León: Well, we have to organize, we have to do everything possible, and my role is to do everything possible to defend the interests, promoting the necessary polices. In defense matters in a given case, if there are raids, massive deportations, the local police will not cooperate with the federal government. [We will] intervene in the deportation[s]. If someone has a crime, for example: a violent criminal, a violent bandit, an assassin, a [drug] trafficker, that’s another thing. But the majority of our working people are hardworking people.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: Thank you very much Senator Kevin de León for being here on Conexión California

Kevin de León: No Jairo, it’s a pleasure for me. Thank you very much.

Jairo Diaz Pedraza: Thank you very much. Let’s take a break.

Video Filehttps://youtu.be/dDqfNiZRDl4

California Democrats Sanctuary Includes Violent Criminals

As published on Fox and Hounds Daily

Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon (D-Los Angeles) and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon (D-Paramount) have been clear that they oppose California allowing the state or its sanctuary cities from cooperating with immigration officials unless the individual committed a violent crime.

Under California law, throwing acid at someone or rape of an unconscious, intoxicated or mentally ill victim is not considered a violent crime. Neither is vehicular manslaughter, assault with a deadly weapon, arson, solicitation of murder or exploding a destructive device or explosive with intent to injure. 

A recent article by Jazmine Ulloa, Los Angeles Times, makes this clear distinction:

After being accused of rape, Andrew Luster jumped his $1-million bail and was later captured in Mexico by a bounty hunter on TV.

Ventura County prosecutors said he drugged three women and videotaped the assaults, and a jury convicted him of 86 counts of poisoning, sexual battery and rape of an unconscious or intoxicated person. But with none of his offenses listed among the 23 crimes that California considers “violent” felonies in its penal code….

In drawing the line at crime violence, why would Kevin de Leon and Anthony Rendon extend sanctuary and protection to predators like Andrew Luster?

While Eric Holder will be in Sacramento tomorrow, collecting his $25,000 a-month-taxpayer-funded-check from the state’s taxpayers via our Legislature, he needs to be the adult in the room and ask the Democratic leadership to remove their rose-colored glasses and realize that there are distinctions between “hardened criminals,” “undocumented immigrants,” and those who perpetrate the abbreviated state list of “violent crimes.”

Ending “sanctuary city” ordinances does not mean that law enforcement in those communities become “quasi immigration enforcement officers.” Rather, it reopens the door to the real need of providing continued cooperation between law enforcement and immigration officials and ensuring societally dangerous and violent criminals are identified, detained and deported. They should also include those convicted of gang activities, rape, arson or those who sexually assault the elderly or mentally ill victims.

The following crimes are not covered by the definition of violent crimes under recently passed Proposition 57:

Here is short list of crimes California does not consider violent: 

・ Vehicular manslaughter

・ Human trafficking involving a minor

・ Battery with personal infliction of serious bodily injury

・ Throwing acid or flammable substance

・ Assault with a deadly weapon

・ Assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer or firefighter

・ Discharging firearm at an occupied dwelling, building, vehicle or airport

・ Rape where victim legally capable of giving consent

・ Rape by intoxicating substance

・ Rape where victim unconscious of the act

・ Rape/sodomy/oral copulation of unconscious person or by use of date rape drugs

・ Rape by threat of public official

・ Inflicting corporal injury on a child

・ Domestic violence

・ Arson of a structure or forest land

・ Arson of property

・ Solicitation to commit murder

・ Grand theft firearm

・ Assault with a deadly weapon by state prison inmate

・ Any felony involving the personal use of a deadly weapon

・ Holding a hostage by state prison inmate

・ Exploding a destructive device or explosive with intent to injure